How to Apply

The Johnston Center for Integrative Studies at the University of Redlands is one of the most distinctive undergraduate experiences you can choose. It is also one of the most challenging, rewarding and, for those who have experienced it, transformative programs in American higher education today.

Is Johnston right for you?

If at all possible, students interested in the Johnston program should arrange a campus visit. This will be an opportunity to meet current Johnston students and faculty, learn more about courses and graduation contracts, and to really get a feel for the community. You can arrange a visit by contacting our Visit Coordinator.

Applying to the Johnston Center

Students should plan to apply to both the College of Arts and Sciences and to the Johnston program. You may apply concurrently, or you may first apply to the College of Arts and Sciences and then to the Johnston Center. You can apply as a freshman, transfer or international student.

See if Johnston is a good fit for you.

You must be admitted to the university before you can be admitted to the Johnston Center. To access the Johnston Center Supplemental Application, please contact Ashley Morris at ashley_morris@redlands.edu

Admissions Process

Once a student has been admitted to the College of Arts and Sciences, their application and Johnston Center Supplement will be reviewed by the Johnston Center Director. Applicants will be notified by mail of their Johnston Center admission decision.

Students who have been admitted to Johnston prior to Admitted Students Day will be invited to attend a special Johnston welcome session in the afternoon during the event. Students can also expect to receive special advising during fall orientation.

In order for you to apply to Johnston, you must fill out the Supplemental Application.

 Questions you'll have to answer on the Supplemental app:

1). From what you know about the Johnston Center, what most excites you about it? Why?

2). When were you most engaged in your education? When were you least engaged? Describe the circumstances.

3). What role have mentors played in your life? What role do you imagine mentors might play in your college experience?

4). Describe an experience you have had in a cultural setting different from your own. If you have not had such an opportunity, tell us what you might like to do in the future.

5). Describe an experience when you discovered a connection between things that initially appeared unrelated to one another (for example, between math and music, economics and literature, or art and sports).

6). What does it mean to you to be part of a community? How have your experiences in a specific community shaped you? And how do you see yourself participating in an intentional, living-learning community?

7). A full Johnston education asks students to: participate in the living-learning community; develop an education that includes depth in areas of particular interest, liberal arts breadth, and a cross-cultural experience; self-govern through consensus; write and receive narrative evaluations instead of numerical grades; and integrate nodes of learning. Do you have any questions about these values and practices?

8). How did you find out about the Johnston Center?

A Note for Transfer Applicants

It is especially important for transfer students interested in the Johnston Center to plan a visit to campus or a phone interview to discuss the program. Students may find that not all of their credits will be transferrable to the Johnston Center program, or that graduation may take longer than it would in the traditional program. Meeting with a Johnston Center advisor can help clarify these issues for potential transfer students.